SlideReactor starlet at exhibition

A multicompartment SlideReactor is shown at the exhibition “WeltWissen – World Knowledge”.
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This year, Berlin celebrates 200 years of the Humboldt University, 300 years of the Charité, 300 years since the first statute and first publication by the Academy of the Sciences and, one year later, 100 years of the Max Planck and Kaiser Wilhelm Society and the 350th birthday of the Berlin State Library. The exhibition “WeltWissen – World Knowledge” is the high point of the Berlin Year of Science. The Humboldt University, the Charité, the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of the Sciences and Humanities and the Max Planck Society have organised the exhibition as a unique joint project. The Technical University, the Berlin State Museums and the Deutsches Museum, Munich are involved as partners. From 24 September 2010 to 9 January 2011, Martin-Gropius-Bau will be host   ing its “WeltWissen“ (World Knowledge) exhibition which takes a look at 300 years of the science in Berlin from an all-embracing perspective that crosses institutions, disciplines and epochs. The exhibition is the high point of the Berlin Year of Science. On an exhibition space of more than 3,200 square metres, visitors are presented with over 1,500 original exhibits, installations and media stations. The Humboldt University, the Charité, the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of the Sciences and Humanities and the Max Planck Society have organised the exhibition as a unique joint project.
The exhibition correlates sciences in Berlin to the world: only the dynamic interplay of local imprinting and worldwide networking has allowed Berlin since 300 years to generate knowledge and share it with the world. Concrete and highly vivid stories and biographies of objects, researchers and institutions offer exciting insights into the scientific environment. “WeltWissen – World Knowledge” shows how scientists in Berlin work, how they network internationally, how they break down the boundaries of their departments and how they transformed Berlin into a scientific metropolis. 

WeltWissen. 300 Years of Science in Berlin 24 September 2010 – 9 January 2011  Martin-Gropius-Bau, Niederkirchnerstrasse 7, 10963 Berlin
Opening times: Wed - Mo: 10.00 am – 8.00 pm, closed on Tuesdays
Admission: 6 €, reduced 4€ . Free admission for children and adolescents up to an including 16 years of age, two escorts each per kindergarten group or school class as well as recipients of unemployment benefit level II 
Public transport: Underground line 2 (Potsdamer Platz), city train lines 1, 2, 25 (Potsdamer Platz or Anhalter Bahnhof), Buses: M29 (Anhalter Bahnhof) / M41 (Abgeordnetenhaus)
Please find more information at: www.weltwissen-berlin.de, www.gropiusbau.de

Copyright of upper,  large picture:
Roman März

SPAD in children with acute liver failure

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Our latest paper on "Monitoring of liver cell transplantation in a preclinical swine model using magnetic resonance imaging" has been accepted for publication in CELL Medicine (Part B of CELL TRANSPLANTATION). Authors are Nathanael Raschzok, Ulf Teichgräber, Nils Billecke, Anja Zielinski, Kirsten Steinz, Nora N. Kammer, Mehmet H. Morgul, Sarah Schmeisser, Michaela K. Adonopoulou, Lars Morawietz, Bernhard Hiebl, Ruth Schwartlander, Wolfgang Rüdinger, Bernd Hamm, Peter Neuhaus and Igor M. Sauer. The study was based on the excellent colaboration with the department of Radiology and the Institute of Pathology, both Charité - Campus Mitte, Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany, the Centre for Biomaterial Development and Berlin-Brandenburg Centre for Regenerative Therapies (BCRT), Institute for Polymer Research, GKSS Research Centre Geesthacht GmbH, Teltow, Germany, the Department of Materials, ETH Zurich, Zurich, C Switzerland, and Cytonet GmbH, Weinheim, Germany.
Liver cell transplantation (LCT) is a promising treatment approach for certain liver diseases, but clinical implementation requires methods for non-invasive follow-up. Labeling with superparamagnetic iron oxide particles can enable the detection of cells with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We investigated the feasibility of monitoring transplanted liver cells by MRI in a preclinical swine model and used this approach to evaluate different routes for cell application. Liver cells were isolated from landrace piglets and labeled with micron-sized iron oxide particles (MPIO) in adhesion. Labeled cells (n = 10), native cells (n = 3) or pure particles (n = 4) were transplanted to minipigs via intraportal infusion into the liver, direct injection into the splenic parenchyma, or intra-arterial infusion to the spleen. Recipients were investigated by repeated 3.0 Tesla MRI and computed tomography angiography up to 8 weeks after transplantation. Labeling with MPIO, which are known to have a strong effect on the magnetic field, enabled non-invasive detection of cell aggregates by MRI. Following intraportal application, which is commonly applied for clinical LCT, MRI was able to visualize the microembolization of transplanted cells in the liver that were not detected by conventional imaging modalities. Cells directly injected into the spleen were retained, whereas cell infusions intraarterially into the spleen led to translocation and engraftment of transplanted cells in the liver, with significantly fewer microembolisms compared to intraportal application. These findings demonstrate that MRI can be a valuable tool for non-invasive elucidation of cellular processes of LCT and - if clinically applicable MPIO are available - for monitoring of LCT under clinical conditions.  Moreover, the results clarify mechanisms relevant for clinical practice of LCT, suggesting that the intra-arterial route to the spleen deserves further evaluation.

Presentations at this year's XXXVII ESAO Congress

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Hannelore Ringe published the investigations concerning the applicability, efficacy, and safety of single-pass albumin dialysis in children ("Continuous veno-venous single-pass albumin hemodiafiltration in children with acute liver failure." Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2010 Oct 1. [Epub ahead of print]). Co-authors are Varnholt V, Zimmering M, Luck W, Gratopp A, König K, Reich S, Sauer IM, Gaedicke G, and Querfeld U.
The paper reports on a retrospective data review of uncontrolled clinical data of an university-based pediatric intensive care unit collaborating with a local center for liver transplantation.  Nine children, aged 2 to 15 yrs, who were treated with single-pass albumin dialysis for acute liver failure of various origins under a compassionate-use protocol between 2000 and 2006. All patients met high-urgency liver transplantation criteria. Single-pass albumin dialysis was performed as rescue therapy for children with acute liver failure. The decrease in hepatic encephalopathy (grades 1-4) and the serum levels of bilirubin, bile acids, and ammonium were measured to assess the efficacy of detoxification. As a measure of liver synthesis function, thromboplastin time and fibrinogen were analyzed. The safety of the procedure was assessed by documenting adverse effects on mean arterial blood pressure, platelet count, and clinical course. Seven out of nine patients were bridged successfully to either native organ recovery (n = 1) or liver transplantation (n = 7), one of them twice. Six out of nine patients undergoing single-pass albumin dialysis (ten treatments) survived. In six patients, hepatic encephalopathy could be reduced at least by one degree. Ammonium, bilirubin, and bile acid levels decreased in all patients. One patient had an allergic reaction to albumin. In childhood acute liver failure, treatment with single-pass albumin dialysis was generally well tolerated and seems to be effective in detoxification and in improving blood pressure, thus stabilizing the critical condition of children before liver transplantation and facilitating bridging to liver transplantation. It may be beneficial in avoiding severe neurologic sequelae after acute liver failure and thereby improve survival. Single-pass albumin dialysis is an inexpensive albumin-based detoxification system that is easy to set up and requires little training. Whether and to what extent single-pass albumin dialysis can support children with acute liver failure until native liver recovery remain unclear.

XXIII International Congress of TTS

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At this year's XXXVII ESAO Congress, in Skopje. R. Macedonia, Wiebke Werner and Nathanael Raschzok gave oral presentations.
Nathanael Raschzok presented data on  "In vitro evaluation of magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents for labeling of human liver cells" (N. Raschzok, D. A. Muecke, M. Adonopoulou, N. Billecke, A. Zielinski, W. Werner, U. Teichgraeber, I. M. Sauer). Wiebke Werner reported on "Temporal microRNA gene expression profiles of the regenerating rat liver after partial hepatectomy" (W. Werner, N. Raschzok, H. Sallmon, N. Billecke, C. Dame, P. Neuhaus, I. M. Sauer), a joint project of the Department of Neonatology, Charité, and our group.

Berlin Science Year

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Nathanael Raschzok presented our latest results with labeled hepatocytes in the pig model at the XXIII International Congress of The Transplantation Society in Vancouver, Canada. The oral presentation was entitled "MRI enables monitoring of transplanted hepatocytes in a preclinical large animal model" (N. Raschzok, N. Billecke, A. Zielinski, K. Steinz, N.N. Kammer, S. Schmeisser, M.H. Morgul, M.K. Adonopoulou, J. Pinkernelle, L. Morawietz, B. Hiebl, W. Rüdinger, U. Teichgräber, P. Neuhaus, I.M. Sauer).

The 60th Lindau Nobel Laureate Meeting

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Five major scientific institutions in Berlin are celebrating their jubilee in 2010. It is 350 years since the Berlin State Library (Staatsbibliothek zu Berlin) was founded. Three hundred years ago, in 1710, the Charité hospital was erected on the orders of Frederick I, and in the same year the Kurfürstlich Brandenburgische Sozietät der Wissenschaften (Princely Brandenburg Society of the Sciences), which later became the Berlin-Brandenburgische Akademie der Wissenschaften (Berlin Brandenburg Academy of the Sciences), received its first statute. 1810 saw the birth of the Humboldt University, and a century after that it was the turn of the Kaiser Wilhelm Society, the forerunner of the Max Planck Society.
The central exhibition ‘Weltwissen’ (‘Universal Knowledge’), in which all five institutions are taking part, will open at the Martin-Gropius-Bau on 24 September. This gives a panoramic retrospect of 300 years of science in Berlin, from Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz to the Brothers Humboldt and the Brothers Grimm and continuing on to Albert Einstein and Konrad Zuse. The exhibition “World Knowledge” forms the highlight of the Year of Science. Via illustrative stories of objects, researchers and institutions, the exhibition offers insight into the sciences. It illustrates how scientists have developed Berlin into a metropolis of science with a multitude of institutions and museums. The exhibition is a joint production of the Berlin Brandenburg Academy of Sciences, the Charité Berlin, the Humboldt University of Berlin and the Max-Planck- Society. Partners are: the State Library of Prussian Cultural Heritage Foundation, Free University Berlin, Technical University Berlin, the Museum of Natural History Berlin, die State Museums of Berlin and the German Museum in Munich.
More information via
Berlin - Hauptstadt für die Wissenschaft.

XXIV International Congress of TTS 2012 in Berlin

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The 2010 Lindau Meeting took place from June 27 till July 2. The 3rd interdisciplinary meeting brought together more than 650 young researchers from around the globe with 59 Nobel Laureates from the fields of physiology or medicine, physics and chemistry.
The  Lindau Nobel Laureate Meetings provide a globally recognised forum for the transfer of knowledge between generations of scientists. They inspire and motivate Nobel Laureates and international Best Talents. Lectures of Nobel Laureates reflect current scientific topics and present relevant fields of research of the future. In panel discussions, seminars and during the various events of the social program young researchers nominated by a worldwide network of Academic Partners interact with Nobel Laureates.
Taking into account the national selection procedures, in excess of 20,000 young researchers apply to attend each Meeting. After Ruth Schwartländer attended in 2008 this year Nathanael Raschzok was chosen and received an invitation to Lindau.

Hypothermia-induced cell protection & microglial cells

The XXIV International Congress of The Transplantation Society 2012 will take place in Berlin, Germany from 15-20 July, 2012. Chaired by Prof. Dr. Peter Neuhaus the specific objectives of the XXIV International Congress of The Transplantation Society (TTS) will be to promote dialogue and the exchange of experts from around the world. An attractive scientific program will be developed together with the Deutsche Transplantationsgesellschaft (DTG). The Local Organizing Committee (LOC) consists of Prof. Dr. Bernhard Banas, PD Dr. Olaf Guckelberger, PD Dr. Marcus Bahra, PD Dr. Igor M. Sauer and Sylvia Albrecht.

More information, soon via www.transplantation2012.org !

Charité's 300-year anniversary in 2010

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The European Journal of Neuroscience published the paper "Mechanisms of hypothermia-induced cell protection mediated by microglial cells in vitro" First author is Antje Diestel from Katharina Schmitt's group - co-authors are Silke Troeller, Nils Billecke, Igor M. Sauer, Felix Berger and Katharina R. L. Schmitt.
Despite the widespread interest in the clinical applications of hypothermia, the cellular mechanisms of hypothermia-induced neuroprotection have not yet been clearly understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to elucidate the cellular effects of clinically relevant hypothermia and rewarming on the morphological and functional characteristics of microglia. Microglial cells were exposed to a dynamic cooling and rewarming protocol. For stimulation, microglial cells were treated with 1 μg/mL lipopolysaccharide (LPS). We found that hypothermia led to morphological changes from ramified to ameboid cell shapes. At 2 h after hypothermia and rewarming, microglial cells were again ramified with extended branches. Moreover, we found enhanced cell activation after rewarming, accompanied by increased phagocytosis and adenosine triphosphate consumption. Interestingly, hypothermia and rewarming led to a time-dependent significant up-regulation of the anti-inflammatory cytokines interleukin-10 and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist in stimulated microglial cells. This is in line with the reduced proliferation and time-dependent down-regulation of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 in comparison to normothermic control cells after LPS stimulation. Furthermore, degradation of the inhibitor of the nuclear transcription factor-kappaB (IkappaB-alpha) was diminished and delayed under conditions of cooling and rewarming in LPS-stimulated microglial cells. Thus, our results show that hypothermia and rewarming activate microglial cells, increase phagocytosis and shift the balance of cytokine release in stimulated microglial cells towards the anti-inflammatory cytokines. This could be a new cellular mechanism of hypothermia-induced neuroprotection mediated by activated microglial cells.
European Journal of Neuroscience, 2010; 31: 779-787

XXXVII ESAO Congress in Skopje

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At the Charité, our scientists and physicians engage in state-of-the-art research, patient care and education. More than half of the German Nobel Prize winners in medicine and physiology come from the Charité, among them Emil von Behring, Robert Koch and Paul Ehrlich. The Charité also has an international reputation for excellence in training. It extends over four campuses with more than 100 clinics and institutes bundled under 17 CharitéCenters. The Charité has a turnover of nearly 1 billion euros per year, and it is one of the largest employers in Berlin with 14,500 employees.
In 2010, the Charité will celebrate its 300-year anniversary and will do everything to make this historical event a memorable one.
Short film covering the Charité - Universitätsmedizin celebrating its 300-year anniversary  (47.91 MB)

Modified nanoparticles & multimodal imaging

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The XXXVII ESAO Congress will take place in Skopje at the Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts on September 8-11, 2010.
Skopje is the capital of Macedonia and the centre of the political, cultural and social life. It is a modern, urban city with a history dating more than 2000 years back. Skopje, once called Skupi, over the history was conquered and ruined several times, but always rebuilt again. It has suffered several natural catastrophes, the last being the earthquake in 1963. Some of the monuments from long ago have still remained: the remainings from the old city, the roman architecture, the fortress, the stone bridge, many churches and monasteries, frescoes and carvings from the middle ages, mosques and amams built by the ottomans in the old bazaar. Old Skopje with its very rich treasures is a very attractive tourist destination. It is very well connected by air and land with the rest of the world.
The Macedonian Academy of Sciences and Arts, as the venue of the ESAO Congress in 2010, will provide the atmosphere for a perfect scientific event. You will enjoy “state of the art” presentations and lectures in some of the most attractive fields of medicine. The ESAO Congress 2010 will bring together distinguished clinicians and scientists of biotechnologies and bioengineering from all over the world. They will discuss results from scientific research in all areas of artificial organs. Our aim is to bring together and to foster exchange and collaboration among scientists, clinicians and industrial partners.
Aleksandar Sikole, the Congress President 2010, cordially welcomes you to Skopje to the ESAO 2010 Annual Congress.
More information via
http://www.esao2010.org.mk/ .

XXIII International Congress of TTS

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Lars Stelter's studies on In vitro and in vivo detectability of modified superparamagnetic nanoparticles for multimodal imaging using fluorescence microscopy, 3T MRI and animal PET are published in the latest issue of Molecular Imaging & Biology (Mol Imaging Biol. 2010 Jan-Feb;12(1):25-34). Co-authors are Jens Pinkernelle, Roger Michel, Ruth Schwartländer, Nathanael Raschzok, Mehmet H. Morgul, Martin Koch, Timm Denecke, Holger Amthauer, Juri Ruf, Andreas Jordan, Bernd Hamm, Igor M. Sauer, Ulf Teichgräber.
Cell transplantation is a major field in regenerative medicine and a promising alternative to whole organ transplantation. However, the process of cell engraftment is not yet fully understood and the hitherto achieved clinical outcome is limited. The aim of our study was to modify an aminosilan-coated nanoparticle for cell labeling and make it applicable for multimodal imaging using MRI, PET and fluorescent imaging. HIV-1 tat, linked FITC, and Gallium-68 were covalently bound to the particle and injected into Wistar rats. Animal-PET imaging was performed followed by MRI at 3.0T. Hepatic accumulation of the particles was proven by radionuclide distribution after 10 minutes in PET as well as in MRI over a 24 hour-period. Histological workup of the liver also revealed content of iron oxide particles in the reticuloendothelial system. Adjacent in vitro studies incubating hepatogenic HuH7 cells with the particles showed a rapid intracellular accumulation, clearly detectable by fluorescence microscopy and MRI. In conclusion our modified nanoparticle is stable under in vitro and in vivo conditions and is applicable for multimodal molecular imaging. Cellular labeling with this particle is possible and might help to get new insights into understanding the process of cell transplantation.

Presentations at GASL 2010

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The XXIII International Congress of The Transplantation Society, the leading international congress on transplantation biology and medicine, will be held in Vancouver, Canada from 15 - 19 August 2010. The translational program will draw together experts from around the world, and will encompass innovations in genomics and proteomics, molecular analyses of human diseases, innovations in biological and pharmacological immunosuppression, novel approaches to tolerance induction, technical advances in robotic surgery and imaging, advances in clinical practice and many other topics at the cutting edge of stem-cell, cellular and solid organ transplantation.
The XXIII Congress will be one of the largest and most exciting international gatherings of clinicians and scientists in the field of transplantation, drawing more than 4,000 delegates from all parts of the world. The international delegation will enjoy a stellar Scientific Program, commencing with a comprehensive and cutting-edge Postgraduate Education Program on Saturday 14th August and Sunday 15th August, and continuing with a panoply of outstanding plenary symposia, state of the art lectures, individual scientific presentations, and thematic symposia from Monday 16th August to Thursday 19th August inclusive.
The 2010 Congress will provide an outstanding opportunity for networking with colleagues and leading experts, and for sharing and discussing clinical advances, late-breaking discoveries and therapeutic advances in this field.
More information is available via 
www.transplantation2010.org. Furthermore, you may download the 2nd announcement here
Important dates:
  • Abstract Submission Opens: October 2009
  • Online Registration Opens: November 2009
  • Abstract Submission Deadline: 5 March 2010
  • Author Notification of Acceptance: 7 May 2010
  • Early Registration Deadline: 4 June 2010
  • Late Breaking Abstract Deadline: 11 June 2010
  • Hotel Reservation Deadline: 25 June 2010
  • Regular Registration Deadline: 16 July 2010