Evaluation of a new knotting concept – Fikatas knot

Fikatas

Implantation of a Neo Bile Duct in domestic pigs

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European Surgical Research accepted our latest paper entitled "Implantation of a tissue engineered Neo Bile Duct in domestic pigs" for publication. Authors are B. Struecker, K. Hillebrandt, N. Raschzok, K. Jöhrens, A. Butter, P. Tang, A. Andreou, H. Napierala, D. Polenz, A. Reutzel-Selke, T. Denecke, J. Pratschke, and I.M Sauer.

Extrahepatic bile duct injuries remain severe complications during cholecystectomy and often require reconstruction by bilioenteric anastomosis (i.e. hepatico-jejunostomy), which comes along with further long-term complications (e.g. recurring ascending cholangitis, secondary biliary cirrhosis). Furthermore, in case of inherent extrahepatic biliary atresia or during liver transplant artificial or engineered bile ducts could enable novel surgical strategies without the need for hepatico-jejunostomy. We present data on the implantation of in vitro generated Neo Bile Ducts in five domestic pigs. Neo Bile Ducts were engineered through decellularization of allogeneic blood vessels and recellularization with autologous cholangiocytes.On postoperative days 0, 1, 7 and 14 blood samples were taken and analyzed (AST, ALT, Bilirubin, Alkaline Phosphatase, Creatinine and Leukocytes). An magnetic resonance cholangiography was performed on postoperative day 14 with one pig. 14 days after implantation pigs were sacrificed and bile ducts were explanted. All pigs survived the complete study period without severe complications. None of the pigs showed signs of biliary leakage or peritonitis. Neo Bile Ducts were infiltrated by neutrophils and neo-angiogenesis was observed around and into the implanted tissue. Whether the presented technique enables the long-term replacement of native bile ducts has to be further evaluated.

Human hepatocyte isolation – new paper

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Tissue Engineering, Part C: Methods accepted our paper „Human hepatocyte isolation: Does portal vein embolization affect the outcome?“ Authors are Martin Kluge, Anja Reutzel-Selke, Hendrik Napierala, Karl H. Hillebrandt, Rebeka D. Major, Benjamin Struecker, Annekatrin Leder, Jeffrey Siefert, Peter Tang, Steffen Lippert, Daniel Seehofer, Johann Pratschke, Igor M. Sauer und Nathanael Raschzok.

Primary human hepatocytes are widely used for basic research, pharmaceutical testing, and therapeutic concepts in regenerative medicine. Human hepatocytes can be isolated from resected liver tissue. Preoperative portal vein embolization (PVE) is increasingly used to decrease the risk of delayed postoperative liver regeneration by induction of selective hypertrophy of the future remnant liver tissue. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of PVE on the outcome of hepatocyte isolation. Primary human hepatocytes were isolated from liver tissue obtained from partial hepatectomies (n=190) using the two-step collagenase perfusion technique followed by Percoll purification. Of these hepatectomies, 27 isolations (14.2%) were performed using liver tissue obtained from patients undergoing PVE prior to surgery. All isolations were characterized using parameters that had been described in the literature as relevant for the outcome of hepatocyte isolation. The PVE and non-PVE groups were similar in regard to donor parameters (sex, age, indication for surgery), isolation parameters (liver weight, cold ischemic time), and the quality of the liver tissue. The mean initial viable cell yield did not differ between the PVE and non-PVE groups (10.16±2.03x106 cells/g vs. 9.70±0.73 x106 cells/g, p=0.499). The initial viability was slightly better in the PVE-group (77.8 ±2.03% vs. 74.4 ±1.06%). The mean viable cell yield (p=0.819) and the mean viability (p=0.141) after Percoll purification did not differ between the groups. PVE had no effect on enzyme leakage and metabolic activity of cultured hepatocytes.
Although PVE leads to drastic metabolic alterations and changes in hepatic blood flow, embolized liver tissue is a suitable source for the isolation of primary human hepatocytes and is equivalent to untreated liver tissue in regard to cell yield and viability.

Dr. Jan Schröder

Today, Jan Schröder successfully defended his thesis (summa cum laude) entitled "Vergleichende in vivo und in vitro Analysen im Rahmen der Etablierung der kombinierten Leber- und Leberzelltransplantation im Rattenmodell" !

Congratulations !

Karl Hillebrandt – YPT Rising Star

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Karl Hillebrandt won this year's YPT Rising Stars Video Session Award. He presented the studies on „Optimized decellularization of rat livers by arterial and portal venous perfusion under oscillating pressure conditions“ during the 17th congress of the European Society for Organ Transplantation (ESOT) 2015 in Brüssel. Young Professionals in Transplantation (YPT) is a forum for junior professionals throughout Europe working in the field of transplantation.

The Morning After

Referring to our paper „CD44 and CXCL9 serum protein levels predict the risk of clinically significant allograft rejection after liver transplantation“ Geoffrey W. McCaughan, Patrick Bertolino and David G. Bowen wrote an interesting editorial entitled „Could The Morning After liver transplant be immunologically interesting?“

They conclude, „that our study urges us to study the immune system response in liver allograft recipients during the very early phases after liver transplantation and to explore how events in immune organs and the allograft are reflected within the serum. Whether the patterns observed truly represent early detection of ACR versus tolerance, or a combination of both, requires further study and experimentation, including the identification of the cellular sources of these and other potential markers of immune outcome. It seems that despite significant levels of immunosuppressive drugs, immune activation and engagement occurs very early after human liver transplant, within the first 24 hours, in a manner that may have similarities with experimental animal models. Thus, the morning after effect could be an exciting window to longer-term immune outcomes, rather than just being preoccupied with observing important routine outcomes and detecting early complications.“ See Liver Transplantation, Volume 21, Issue 9, pages 1120–1122, September 2015

Publication in Jove

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„Procedure for Decellularization of Rat Livers in an Oscillating-pressure Perfusion Device“ is available in J Vis Exp. 2015 Aug 10;(102). doi: 10.3791/53029 – accessible via the JOVE servers. Authors are K. Hillebrandt, D. Polenz, A. Butter, P. Tang, A. Reutzel-Selke, A. Andreou, H. Napierala, N. Raschzok, J. Pratschke, I.M. Sauer, and B. Struecker . The presented techniques for liver harvesting, cannulation and perfusion using our proprietary device enable sophisticated perfusion set-ups to improve decellularization and recellularization experiments in rat livers.

microRNAs in liver tissue engineering

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Our paper "microRNAs in liver tissue engineering - New promises for failing organs" was accepted for publication in Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews (IF: 15.038). Authors are Nathanael Raschzok, Hannes Sallmon, Johann Pratschke and Igor M. Sauer.

miRNA-based technologies provide attractive tools for several liver tissue engineering approaches. Herein, we review the current state of miRNA applications in liver tissue engineering. Several miRNAs have been implicated in hepatic disease and proper hepatocyte function. However, the clinical translation of these findings into tissue engineering has just begun. miRNAs have been successfully used to induce proliferation of mature hepatocytes and improve the differentiation of hepatic precursor cells. Nonetheless, miRNA-based approaches beyond cell generation have not yet entered preclinical or clinical investigations. Moreover, miRNA-based concepts for the biliary tree have yet to be developed. Further research on miRNA based modifications, however, holds the promise of enabling significant improvements to liver tissue engineering approaches due to their ability to regulate and fine-tune all biological processes relevant to hepatic tissue engineering, such as proliferation, differentiation, growth, and cell function.

CD44 and CXCL9 predicting rejection after LTx

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Based on a fruitful collaboration with the department of Visceral, Transplantation, Thoracic, and Vascular Surgery at the University of Leipzig our paper on CD44 and CXCL9 serum protein levels predict the risk of clinically significant allograft rejection after liver transplantationhas been accepted for publication in Liver Transplantation.
Authors are Nathanael Raschzok, Anja Reutzel-Selke, Rosa Bianca Schmuck, Mehmet Haluk Morgul, Ulrich Gauger, Kukuh Aji Prabowo, Laura-Marie Tannus, Annekatrin Leder, Benjamin Struecker, Sabine Boas-Knoop, Michael Bartels, Sven Jonas, Christian Lojewski, Gero Puhl, Daniel Seehofer, Marcus Bahra, Andreas Pascher, Johann Pratschke, and Igor Maximilian Sauer.

The diagnosis of acute cellular rejection (ACR) after liver transplantation is based on histological analysis of biopsies because non-invasive biomarkers for allograft rejection are not yet established for clinical routines. CD31, CD44, and CXCL9 have previously been described as biomarkers for cross-organ allograft rejection. Here, we assessed the predictive and diagnostic value of these proteins as serum biomarkers for clinically significant ACR in the first six months after liver transplantation in a prospective study. The protein levels were measured in 94 patients immediately prior to transplantation, at postoperative days (POD) 1, 3, 7, and 14, and when biopsies were performed during episodes of biochemical graft dysfunction. Our results suggest that CD44 and CXCL9 may serve as predictive biomarkers to identify liver allograft recipients at risk for clinically significant ACR.

Cover – march issue of Tissue Engineering

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One of the figures of our paper „Porcine liver decellularization under oscillating pressure conditions – A technical refinement to improve the homogeneity of the decellularization process“ made it to the cover of the march issue of Tissue Engineering, Part C : Methods.

Congratulations to Dietrich Polenz, who made the corrosion cast of a decellularized pig liver matrix: red, hepatic artery; blue, portal vein; yellow, bile duct and gallbladder.

Particles for microRNA-targeted manipulation

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Biomaterials accepted our paper on „Micron-sized iron oxide-containing particles for microRNA-targeted manipulation and MRI-based tracking of transplanted cells“. Authors are Annekatrin Leder, Nathanael Raschzok, Christian Schmidt, Duygu Arabacioglu, Antje Butter, Susanne Kolano, Luisa S. de Sousa Lisboa, Wiebke Werner, Dietrich Polenz, Anja Reutzel-Selke, Johann Pratschke, and Igor M. Sauer.

Particle-based delivery systems for therapeutic manipulation and tracking of transplanted cells by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are commonly based on nanometer-sized superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIOs). Here, we present a proof of concept for multifunctional, silica based micron-sized iron oxide-containing particles (sMPIO) that combine fluorescence imaging, MRI tracking, and on-the-spot targeting of specific microRNAs on a particle surface for therapeutic manipulation by RNA interference. Antisense locked nucle-LNA) were covalently bound to the surface of silica-based, DAPI-integrated, micron-sized iron oxide particles (sMPIO--LNA). In vitro studies using primary human hepatocytes showed rapid particle uptake (4 hours) that was accompanied by significant depletion of the targeted microRNA Let7g (80%), up- regulation of the target proteins Cyclin D1 and c-Myc, and specific proteome changes. sMPIO--LNA- labeled cells were successfully detected by fluorescence imaging and could be visualized by MRI after intrasplenic transplantation in rats. This new theranostic particle provides a promising tool for cell transplantation where cellular imaging and microRNA-based manipulation is needed.

Biomaterials is the leading journal in its field. Impact factors released by ISI in July 2014 showed Biomaterials with an impact factor of 8.312!

UPDATE: The paper is available online here!

Decellularization of pancreata – EPITA Award

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Ben Strücker presented our latest results on DECELLULARIZATION OF WHOLE RAT PANCREATA – EVALUATION OF THREE DIFFERENT PERFUSION ROUTES at the 5th EPITA Winter Symposium in Innsbruck from the 25th to the 27th of January 2015. He received the AIDPIT&EPITA Award for the best oral presentation.
Congratulations!

Ben Strücker presented three effective protocols for rat pancreas perfusion decellularization, evaluating different perfusion routes. In contrast to liver decellularization the perfusion route seems to have no major impact on decellularization results. The dPECMs could serve for cellular repopulation with islets from a different (xenogene) origin to generate functional, transplantable endocrine pancreata in vitro.

Neujahrsessen 2015 - Sechster Februar, Nudo Berlin

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Forschungs-Colloquium I – 2015

Das erste gemeinsame Forschungs-Colloquium der Chirurgischen Klinik an den Standorten CCM und CVK im Jahr 2015 findet im Hörsaal der Pathologie im Erdgeschoss des Forschungshauses, Charité – Campus Virchow Klinikum, Forum 4, am 10 Januar 2015 von 10:00 Uhr bis 17:30 Uhr statt. Forschungs-Colloquium